To make a booking call +44 (0) 1483 209 888

Destinations

Click on the city name to see departures.

Bath

Bath

Built for pleasure and relaxation, beautiful Bath has been a wellbeing destination since Roman times. The waters are still a big draw, both at the ancient Roman Baths and the thoroughly modern Thermae Bath Spa, which houses the only natural thermal hot springs in Britain you can bathe in. Bath?s compact, visitor-friendly centre is overflowing with places to eat and drink, plus some of the finest independent shops in Britain, making it the ideal destination. Immerse yourself in Baths remarkable collection of museums and galleries, and enjoy year-round festivals, theatre, music and sports.

Blenheim Palace

Blenheim

Blenheim Palace was built as a gift to John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, from Queen Anne and a grateful nation in thanks for his victory at the Battle of Blenheim on 13th August 1704. Today, the Palace is home to one of the most important and extensive collections in Europe, which includes portraits, furniture, sculpture and tapestries. Amongst the many treasures to be found in the State Rooms are the famous Marlborough Tapestries ( the 'Victories Series') in the Green Writing Room and the First, Second and Third State Rooms. Be sure not to miss the magnificent Long Library with its walls lined by more than 10,000 books, many of them hundreds of years old and of great historic significance.

Bournemouth

Bournemouth

With a wide selection of shops, restaurants, and attractions along the seafront, buzzing nightlife, theatres & shows, events and endless surrounding countryside with beautiful award winning gardens - Bournemouth really is a cosmopolitan town appealing to all ages and interests.

For those who fancy a stroll along the sea-front, why not try the Pier to Pier walk! Starting at Boscombe or Bournemouth Pier and finishing at the other. Enjoy a delightfully scenic stroll along the promenade and either treat yourself to an ice-cream (if the weather is in favour) or a delicious afternoon tea at one of the eateries at either end.

Bressingham Steam & Gardens

Bressingham

Transfer from the train to Bressingham Steam & Gardens, what better way to explore the beautiful gardens, woodlands and countryside of Bressingham than by climbing aboard a magnificent steam engine! With over four miles of narrow-gauge steam lines and four journeys to choose from, it's the perfect way to relax and enjoy the scenery!

Bristol

Bristol

Bristol straddles the River Avon in the southwest of England and has a prosperous maritime history. Its former city-centre port is now a cultural hub, and at the Harbourside, the M Shed museum explores local social and industrial heritage. The harbour's 19th-century warehouses now contain restaurants, shops and cultural institutions such as contemporary art gallery The Arnolfini. Other iconic attractions include Brunel's Clifton Suspension Bridge and SS Great Britain.

Waterside walks provide a constantly changing view.

For more information head to www.visitbristol.co.uk

Cambridge

Cambridge

The University buildings with their golden stone and intricate carvings form a magnificent backdrop to the compact city with the River Cam winding through the centre and alongside the "backs" - the beautiful parks.

The ancient Britons, Romans, Saxons and Normans all put their mark on Cambridge and the first of the University's 31 colleges, Peterhouse, was founded in 1284. This was followed by Clare (1326) and Pembroke (1347).

King's College Chapel is breathtaking with the largest (and widely considered most beautiful) fan vault in the world, 26 pre-Reformation stained glass windows and the wooden organ screen - a gift from Henry VIII to Anne Boleyn on their marriage. On Sundays there is Evensong at 3.30pm.

Find out more at www.visitcambridge.org

Canterbury

Canterbury

Inside the cathedral, one of England's best known buildings, Thomas Becket was infamously killed and a memorial to him now stands. This magnificent building with its origins dating back to 597AD backs on to the traffic-free High Street with many shops, pubs, tea rooms and galleries, offering a mixture of old and new.

The River Stour winds its way through the middle of the city and in summer punts can be hired for a leisurely trip.

Cardiff

Cardiff

Cardiff?s rich culture has a diverse range of influences, from the Romans and Normans of antiquity to the industrial revolution and the coal industry - which transformed Cardiff from a small town into a thriving, international city.

Cardiff's city centre provides an excellent mix of old and new, with the imposing Castle, beautiful Llandaff Cathedral and the lovely National History Museum sitting alongside modern shopping districts, harbour and the Millennium Stadium.

Carlisle & Settle

Carlisle

The journey to Carlisle takes you over the Settle & Carlisle Railway route in at least one direction, which carves its way through the Cumbrian Mountains and across the famous Ribblehead Viaduct.

Once in the ancient city, which dates back to Roman times, there is much to see and do. Particular highlights include the magnificent Castle founded in 1092 and nearby Citadel built by Henry VIII, as well as the beautiful Cathedral with its famous 14th century stained glass window.

For art lovers, there is no better place to begin exploring the city's fascinating past than the award winning Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery. The classical Grade One Listed Jacobean building is full of exciting exhibits and interactive displays.

Chepstow

Chepstow

Spend some time exploring Chepstow's winding Georgian and Victorian streets with a variety of shops, restaurants and cafes, and take in the old town walls and the 15th Century gatehouse.

The first stone castle to built in Britain following the Norman Conquest still stands guard over the River Wye as it nears its confluence with the Severn Estuary. And the town that grew up around it has been an important port and market centre ever since.

Corfe

Corfe

The dramatic ruins of Corfe Castle stand on a natural hill guarding the principal route through the Purbeck Hills. Nothing could pass in or out without going past the Castle. With breathtaking views across Purbeck, you can't fail to be captivated by these romantic castle ruins.

The village surrounding the castle is constructed almost completely from the local grey Purbeck limestone and comprises two main streets, East Street and West Street, linked at their north end at the Square and offers a unique range of independant shops, tea-houses and restaurants.

Dereham - Mid Norfolk Railway

Dereham

An 11 mile long trip along the full length of the restored heritage line betweeen Wymondham and Dereham through picturesque Norfolk countryside with time to explore the vibrant market town and its considerable range of independant shops and cafes.

Ely

Ely

Explore Ely Cathedral with its unique Octagon Tower, experience the famous and unique Stained Glass Museum or visit Oliver Cromwell's House, home to Ely's most famous past resident, with its specially restored rooms and exhibits on 17th Century Life.

For more information about the city of Ely, including information on the various markets, tours and places of interest, please go to visitely.eastcambs.gov.uk

Gloucester

Gloucester

The Cathedral, founded in 700AD, one of Europe's architectural glories, is the resting place of murdered King Edward II and the glazed cloisters are the most complete medieval example of their kind in England - the setting for parts of the famous Harry Potter films. Parliament has also been held within its walls.

Gloucester?s restored 200-year old historic docks contain two museums, an antiques market and a shopping centre.

For fans of Beatrix Potter, there is also a Beatrix Potter Museum and Shop based in the original building used by Beatrix Potter in her wonderful story, and brings her magical world to life with displays, illustrations and unique gifts.

Journey with Flying Scotsman

Journey

Enjoy a trip behind Flying Scotsman through beautiful scenery.

This special one-off trip is routed via Berkshire and Wiltshire via Didcot to Reading, then along the scenic route through Hungerford along the Kennet and Avon canal, past the Vale of Pewsey with the White Horses and back along the Great Western Railway line for some fast running through Swindon before heading back to Didcot and finally Oxford.

Leeds Castle

Leeds

Often described as one of the most beautiful castles in the World. During its 900 year history, Leeds Castle has been a Norman stronghold; the private property of six of England's medieval queens; a palace used by Henry VIII and his first wife Catherine of Aragon; a Jacobean country house; a Georgian mansion; an elegant early 20th century retreat for the influential and famous; and in the 21st century. It has become one of the most visited historic buildings in Britain.

Lincoln

Lincoln

Standing proudly above the fens, Lincoln was the capital of the Roman Province covering most of eastern England. Its Cathedral was founded in 1072 by William the Conqueror.

Today the world famous Cathedral and castle are at the centre of a vivacious city where the historic Bailgate and the regenerated Waterside and St Marks areas provide plenty for shoppers and sightseers.

For up to date information on tours and events in the city of Lincoln, go to www.visitlincoln.com.

London

London

Enjoy an unforgettable day out to Britain's capital city. Take an open-top bus tour, or for a more gentle pace, take a cruise down the Thames to discover Londons top attractions such St Pauls Cathedral, Buckingham Palace and the London Eye. There is also a multitude of galleries and museums, all of which combine to make London one of the greatest cities in the World. Shopping opportunities are endless, from world famous department stores to historic street markets and everything in between.

Lowestoft

Lowestoft

Sitting proudly in the northernmost part of The Suffolk Coast is Lowestoft. Famous for being the most easterly town and the first place to see the sunrise in the UK, it's also the birthplace of composer Benjamin Britten.

The town is a favourite with families, and there's plenty to see and do; with two piers, a wildlife park, an award-winning sandy beach, museums and the bustling 'Scores' a series of pretty lanes showcasing Lowestoft's rich history.

Take the scenic river taxi to Oulton Broad to see more of the Suffolk Coast.

Lydney

Lydney

The thriving town of Lydney covers approximately eight square miles, and stands on the north bank of the UK's longest river, the Severn.

Lydney is also home to a historic dockyard and harbour, once used for transporting coal, stone and timber from the nearby Forest of Dean.

Norwich

Norwich

Walking around Norwich feels like stepping back in time, surrounded by ancient architecture including the iconic Norwich Cathedral with its 315 foot spire and the largest Cathedral Close in England. Building work started in 1096 and a canal was constructed to bring the large stones from Normandy. The Cathedral draws many visitors from around the world.

The castle, dating from around 1160, contains the castle museum which houses a collection from the Norwich School of Painters.

For more information about Norwich and its attractions, go to visitnorwich.co.uk

Oxford

Oxford

The Bodleian Library (which claims to purchase every book published in the UK), part of Britain?s oldest museum - the Ashmolean.

Add to this a bustling shopping centre, the beautiful River Thames winding through the city and lovely parks and gardens and the main problem will be deciding how to spend your time in Oxford!

It is possible to visit most of the University Colleges, Museums and Galleries and there are also two-hour walking tours of the city which include visits to college and university sites.

For up-to-date information about walking tours and events in Oxford, go to www.visitoxfordandoxfordshire.com/oxford.

Portsmouth Harbour

Portsmouth

From the naval and maritime heritage, to towering world-class visitor attractions, museums and galleries, unique shopping destinations, great places to eat and miles of beautiful waterfront, Portsmouth offers something for everyone.

Get a unique view over the City, Solent and Isle of Wight from the 90 metre high Spinnaker Tower with its gravity defying glass floor!

Fans of naval or military history will be spoilt for choice with the Historic Dockyard exhibiting over 800 years of naval history within the surroundings of its working docks, and the D-Day Museum on the seafront, the UK's only museum dedicated to the Normandy landings that took place during WW2. You'll also discover Southsea Castle, built by Henry VIII as well as many historic forts, follies, towers and the Royal Marines Museum.

A walk along the Millennium Trail, a 3km walk along the waterfront, taking in Old Portsmouth, Gunwharf Quays and many of Portsmouth's old defences, is highly recommended.

Salisbury

Salisbury

Known as ?The city in the countryside?, the magnificent medieval city of Salisbury has it all; historic streets and alleyways, charming half-timbered buildings, traditional English eating houses and pretty shopping streets, not to mention a superb range of attractions, including the UK?s finest medieval cathedral.

Salisbury Cathedral offers one superlative after another, from the tallest spire in Britain to the world?s best-preserved Magna Carta. It stands in the largest medieval close in Britain, where you will also find award-winning museums.

Don?t miss a stroll along the Town Path across the water meadows; the awe-inspiring sight of the Cathedral has been described as ?Britain?s best view?!

Sherborne

Sherborne

Set in the middle of the delightful town and only a few minutes walk from the station, Sherborne Abbey has been a Cathedral, a Parish Church and a Monastery. Surrounded by almshouses, Cathedral cottages and the famous schools, the Abbey is a lovely place to visit.

Sherborne is also home to two castles - Old Castle dating back to the 12th Century and a newer one originally built by Sir Walter Raleigh in 1594.

To find out more about Sherborne and its various attractions, visit www.sherbornetown.com

Stratford upon Avon

Stratford

Synonymous with Shakespeare, whose birthplace incorporates a museum illustrating his life, Stratford is also home to the Royal Shakespeare Company and the beautiful River Avon. Holy Trinity church, where Shakespeare is buried, is one of the loveliest parish churches and nearby Hall?s Croft, Nash?s House and New Place all give further insights into Shakespeare?s Stratford. The Swan Theatre, home to the Royal Shakespeare Company, provides a lovely place from which to admire the River Avon with its many swans.

Shopping too is a treat with many individual and specialist shops within easy reach.

Image courtesy of ©Visit England

Swanage

Swanage

Swanage is a traditional Victorian seaside town, set at the heart of Purbeck and built around a beautiful bay sheltered from the north by Ballard Down and at the south, Peveril Point.

A prominent Victorian resident, George Burt, brought many old London Landmarks to the town including frontages and columns from such buildings as Billingsgate Fish Market and the structure of Wellington's Clock Tower. Swanage abounds with curious architectural landmarks, causing it to be christened Little London.

The Bluebell Railway

The

The worlds first preserved standard gauge heritage railway line takes you from East Grinstead to Sheffield Park, cutting through the beautiful Sussex Weald.

Sheffield Park station was really built to serve Lord Sheffield who owned the large house, which still stands to this day. The house and gardens are owned by the National Trust and there is plenty to see and do.

Weymouth

Weymouth

The seafront is connected by over three miles of level promenade which provides access to the beach, rejuvenated town centre, historic harbour and Lodmoor Country Park to create a very special place to visit.

You will never be short of things to do in Weymouth, with an abundance of natural and themed attractions for everyone to enjoy! From sand sculptures to a magical underwater world of dazzling sea creatures, Weymouth has attractions to delight visitors of all ages! A visit to the Nothe Fort is a must! Built by the Victorians to protect Portland Harbour, this unique attraction is a network of underground passages and is steeped in history. Not only that it provides stunning views out towards Portland and over Weymouth Bay.

White Cliffs Circular Tour

White

This circular tour often appeals to those who wish to experience the leisurely pace of steam travel without the need to get off the train at a destination. Passengers can sit back, relax and enjoy views of the white cliffs, the English Channel and Dover Castle.

Winchester

Winchester

This pretty Hampshire city, proclaimed as England's capital by King Alfred in 871 AD, is steeped in history. Aside from the world-famous Cathedral, you can also visit The Great Hall and its legendary Arthurian Round table- the only remaining parts of Winchester castle.

Winchester College is another popular attraction, founded in 1382 it is believed to be the longest continuously running school in the country.

For more information on Winchester, visit www.visitwinchester.co.uk.

Windsor

Windsor

Windsor is a town full of history and charm as you will discover when you visit. The town is dominated by Windsor Castle which is over 900 years old and the largest inhabited castle in the world!

Aside from the Castle, theres much more to see and do, including visiting the award-winning Savill Garden, taking a guided tour of the town's numerous cobbled streets and Tudor buildings, or enjoying a walk along the pretty riverside.

Yeovil Railway Centre

Yeovil

The steam locomotives are turned here on the original turntable, serviced and topped up with coal and water for the return trips, which is fascinating to watch.

York

York

The walled city, with its winding streets and architectural gems, is compact enough for visitors to get a real feel for the place within a couple of hours, although there is so much to see and do, you might want to stay longer.

The stunning Minster with its renowned Rose window is a must-see for any new visitor to York. The National Railway Museum is home to a large collection of notable locomotives and rolling stock. The Jorvik Viking Centre, the medieval guildhalls, Georgian town houses, National Trust and English heritage properties are also well worth a visit.

York's many little lanes and alleyways, known as The Shambles, are full of interesting shops and cafes. The world-famous speciality tea room and patisserie, Betty's, can be found in St Helen's Square - perfect for afternoon tea.

Alternatively, why not take a leisure boat trip on the River Ouse which runs through the city?