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Locomotives

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45699 Galatea

45699

LMS Jubilee Class 45699 Galatea was built at Crewe in April 1936.

46100 Royal Scot

46100

46100 Royal Scot was the first in a new breed of steam locomotives, built by the LMS for their fastest passenger services from London to Birmingham, Manchester and Glasgow.

60103 Flying Scotsman

60103

Built in 1923 for the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) at Doncaster Works to a design of H.N. Gresley, it was employed on long-distance express trains on the LNER and its successors, British Railways Eastern and North-Eastern Regions, notably on the London to Edinburgh Flying Scotsman train service after which it was named.

Black Five 45212

Black

45212 is one of 842 ?Black Fives?, as they became affectionately known, built for the London Midland and Scottish Railway. It is one 18 members of the class to survive into preservation.

Braunton

Braunton

The locomotives were so named after towns on or near the Southern Railway system in the west of England, with the town of Braunton situated in North Devon.

Diesel-Hauled

Diesel-Hauled

The British Rail Class 47 is a class of British railway diesel-electric locomotive that was developed in the 1960s by Brush Traction. A total of 512 Class 47s were built at Crewe Works and Brush's Falcon Works, Loughborough between 1962 and 1968, which made them the most numerous class of British mainline diesel locomotive.

Duchess of Sutherland

Duchess

Built in 1938 in Crewe Works as a high speed express passenger locomotive, 46233 hauled passenger services such as ?The Royal Scot? and ?The Mid-Day Scot' between London Euston and Glasgow Central as well as other expresses to Liverpool.

Flying Scotsman double-headed

Flying

Flying Scotsman set two world records for steam traction, becoming the first steam locomotive to be officially authenticated at reaching 100 miles per hour (160.9 km/h) on 30 November 1934, and then setting a record for the longest non-stop run by a steam locomotive when it ran 422 miles (679 km) on 8 August 1989 while in Australia.

Flying Scotsman one-way

Flying

The locomotive set two world records for steam traction, becoming the first steam locomotive to be officially authenticated at reaching 100 miles per hour (160.9 km/h) on 30 November 1934, and then setting a record for the longest non-stop run by a steam locomotive when it ran 422 miles (679 km) on 8 August 1989 while in Australia.

Mayflower

Mayflower

The B1's were designed as mixed traffic locomotives capable of hauling express passenger trains as well as freight traffic. As powerful, go anywhere engines, the B1's worked across most of the UK rail network from East Anglia to Scotland.

Northern Steam Locomotive Pool

Northern

This pool of locomotives normally includes 46115 Scots Guardsman, 45699 Galatea, 45690 Leander (pictured), 35018 British India Line and Stanier 8F 48151 but may vary throughout the year.

Union of South Africa

Union

It was named after the then newly-formed Union of South Africa, although it had previously been allocated the name "Osprey" on 17 April 1937, when it came out of the paint shop on 29 June. "Osprey" name plates were fitted to the locomotive during the 1980s and early 1990s due to the politics of the time. Its name has since reverted to Union of South Africa. The works number of Union of South Africa was 1853; the plaques are located in the cab itself and not on the exterior cab sides as is the usual practice. Whilst this locomotive is rostered for the trips listed, it cannot be guaranteed