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Locomotives

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60103 Flying Scotsman

60103

Built in 1923 for the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) at Doncaster Works to a design of H.N. Gresley, it was employed on long-distance express trains on the LNER and its successors, British Railways Eastern and North-Eastern Regions, notably on the London to Edinburgh Flying Scotsman train service after which it was named.

60163 Tornado

60163

60163 Tornado is the newest steam engine on the national network. First steamed in 2008, after a 19 year project to fund and build the locomotive, Tornado was built to be not a replica, but the 50th A1. The original 49 A1s were built for the London & North Eastern Railway (LNER) between 1948 and 1949.

61306 Mayflower

61306

The B1's were designed as mixed traffic locomotives capable of hauling express passenger trains as well as freight traffic. As powerful, go anywhere engines, the B1's worked across most of the UK rail network from East Anglia to Scotland.

B1 Class 61264

B1

The B1's were designed by Edward Thompson, Chief Mechanical Engineer of the London North Eastern Railway, as mixed traffic locomotives capable of hauling express passenger trains as well as freight traffic. As powerful, go anywhere engines, the B1's worked across most of the UK rail network from East Anglia to Scotland with a total of 410 locomotives built. 61264 has two cylinders, 6 driving wheels, a firebox grate area of 30 square feet and can operate at 75mph.

Bahamas

Bahamas

The locomotive was built as a standard Jubilee Class in 1934 by the North British Locomotive Company for the London Midland & Scottish Railway (LMS). In May 1961, under the ownership of British Railways, Bahamas was the recipient of several experimental modifications aimed at improving the steam engine. In July 1966, Bahamas was withdrawn from traffic. A preservation society was founded and raised th

British India Line 35018

British

35018 British India Line was one of the first batch of twenty SR Merchant Navy Class steam locomotives to be built by the Southern Railway in 1945.

Double-headed Steam Engines

Double-headed

Rostered locomotives will be updated on the Steam Dreams website as they are confirmed throughout the year.

Duchess of Sutherland

Duchess

Built in 1938 in Crewe Works as a high speed express passenger locomotive, 46233 hauled passenger services such as 'The Royal Scot' and 'The Mid-Day Scot' between London Euston and Glasgow Central as well as other expresses to Liverpool.

Galatea

Galatea

LMS Jubilee Class 45699 Galatea was built at Crewe in April 1936. The engine was named Galatea after HMS Galatea, which in turn was named after the Galatea of mythology, the Goddess of Calm Seas. After nationalisation in 1948, it was renumbered 45699 by British Railways.

Leander

Leander

She was rescued in 1972 and restored into operation. Pictured here in LMS Crimson Lake livery, she returned into operation in October 2014 after spending 18 months being lovingly restored and now runs in British Railways Black Livery.

Northern Steam Locomotive Pool

Northern

This pool of locomotives normally includes 46115 Scots Guardsman, 45699 Galatea, 45690 Leander, 35018 British India Line and Stanier 8F 48151 but may vary throughout the year.

Princess Elizabeth

Princess

She was built for the London, Midland & Scottish (LMS) Railway and was named after the young Princess Elizabeth, later to become Queen Elizabeth II.

Stanier Black Five

Stanier

18 Black Fives survived into preservation with several examples still working on the mainline railway. Members of the class that have feature on previous tours with The Steam Dreams Rail Co. include 45212, 44871, 45407, 45305 & 44932.

Steam Hauled

Steam

The steam locomotive for this trip is still to be confirmed.

Union of South Africa

Union

It was named after the then newly-formed Union of South Africa, although it had previously been allocated the name "Osprey" on 17 April 1937, when it came out of the paint shop on 29 June. "Osprey" name plates were fitted to the locomotive during the 1980s and early 1990s due to the politics of the time. Its name has since reverted to Union of South Africa. The works number of Union of South Africa was 1853; the plaques are located in the cab itself and not on the exterior cab sides as is the usual practice.